Door lock options

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overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Mon 7th Sep, 2020 11:02 pm

I'm finally priming up some internal doors and thinking about what type of door locks to fit. Some previous posts (a good one from 2008!) suggested mortice locks would have been fitted to the grander rooms during Victorian times and this is supported by an absence of rim locks although these might have been removed. Does anyone have any recommendations for suitable mortice locks? I will need to buy quite a few... The doors all have a very pronounced leading edge which might make the fitting a bit more challenging.

What type of knob and escutcheon would be suitable? The options look endless at Broughton's!! A simple/plain round one looks ok to me... Decisions, decisions...

Thanks in advance for any guidance.

Feltwell
Posts: 5627
Joined: Sun 18th May, 2008 7:28 pm
Location: Shropshire, England

Re: Door lock options

Post by Feltwell » Mon 7th Sep, 2020 11:38 pm

Feltwell Towers, late Victorian, has original mortice locks on the 2 main reception rooms and on all doors in the ground floor hallway where doors open into the hall - so the cellar door, opening into the hallway, has a "posh" mortice lock as a rim lock would have been seen when receiving one's visitors (Ohh the shame of it would have been unbearable! :lol: ). The pantry and kitchen doors, which open away from the hallway, have rim locks as they will only be seen from inside the other room, so the visitors were safe :wink: .

1st floor has decent quality rim locks throughout, attic rooms have cheapo pressed steel rim locks, all original.

Door knobs are turned hardwood "beehive" type on brass plates, all original upstairs but had been replaced downstairs with ghastly glass abominations. Luckily I managed to find almost perfect matching reproductions. The escutcheons don't match but look fine, and incidentally the sash window catches are beehive as well, if you're looking for clues for what might have been there originally if you've still got those.

These are close to what I've got, but mine aren't ebonized, they're dark wood. If you've got no reference to what was there originally though then Broughtons do loads of nice options.

https://www.broughtons.com/store/produc ... ood-brass/
https://www.broughtons.com/store/produc ... scutcheon/

If using door knobs the mortice lock has to be the "horizontal" type that gives enough clearance, where the knob sits inboard of the keyhole, sorry if that's stating the obvious! Most are vertical type, latch spindle above keyhole, fine with a lever but which puts a knob too close to the doorframe.

https://www.broughtons.com/store/produc ... hed-brass/

Some items Broughtons will age the brass if asked, if it's not lacquered. I bought some "antiquing mix" ages ago and it works a treat for ageing brass screws etc before use.

overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Sat 26th Sep, 2020 6:43 am

I've just taken delivery of a dozen locks. The 6" mortice locks seem to be longer than a standard length chisel. The specialist tool shops round this way don't seem to carry anything suitable either. Just wondering if there is a simple solution to this or a rather expensive chisel purchase is needed?

Thanks for any good ideas...

Matt

Feltwell
Posts: 5627
Joined: Sun 18th May, 2008 7:28 pm
Location: Shropshire, England

Re: Door lock options

Post by Feltwell » Sat 26th Sep, 2020 10:03 am

You mean for creating the hole inside the door Matt? I've always just used an auger bit - doesn't need to be a perfect hole, the face covers it if you have to go half-a-drill over above and below.

overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Sun 18th Oct, 2020 10:59 pm

Yes Feltwell, to make the hole inside the door to accommodate the lock. I had planned to drill and then clean up the pocket with a chisel. I notice the lock is 14mm thick and our doors are at least 35mm thick. I could use a 18/19mm auger and hope I won't need to clean much more out of the pocket. A standard chisel would have worked for the 5" locks but not the 6" unfortunately...

Gothichome
Posts: 169
Joined: Sun 13th Jan, 2019 12:35 am

Re: Door lock options

Post by Gothichome » Mon 19th Oct, 2020 1:09 am

Matt I have also used a simple wood drill for mortising but I have only don’t two or three in total. For mass production you need a mortising jig. You don’t need a fancy one.
https://youtu.be/s05jmR_aWYQ
Ron

overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Thu 22nd Oct, 2020 11:00 pm

Thanks Ron. That's a great idea. I've placed an order and will hopefully get to try it out at the weekend.

overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Sun 8th Nov, 2020 9:34 pm

The 'Five Minute Morticer' works pretty well - takes around 30 minutes to cut a deep mortice for the 6" locks I am using. A longer shaft was required and the smallest cutter, 19mm is a little big for the 14mm locks we are using and takes a bit too much out of the door - there's a fair bit of lateral movement which cuts an extra couple of mm on top of the cutter size. I've subsequently ordered a 16mm cutter which is the smallest compatible with the tool's shafts. The tool just about clamps onto a 30mm thick door. I've paid around £150 for the standard tool, longer shaft and 16mm cutter and have around 10 doors to do so cost per door makes this worthwhile.

I guess the next problem is finding suitable door handles for a 'thin' door - with only about 5mm timber there's not a lot for the screws to go into. Is there an obvious solution?

Feltwell
Posts: 5627
Joined: Sun 18th May, 2008 7:28 pm
Location: Shropshire, England

Re: Door lock options

Post by Feltwell » Mon 9th Nov, 2020 9:24 am

The knobs I've got on the doors have backing plates that screw onto the timber, but the backing plates is all the screws are holding - the knobs are anchored to each other via the spindle, one is permanently fixed to the spindle and one fixes with a grub screw - the screws hardly do anything, certainly under no real strain.

Worth having a look at what Broughtons have to offer.

a twig
Posts: 607
Joined: Sun 6th Oct, 2013 10:18 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by a twig » Mon 9th Nov, 2020 9:21 pm

What the well felted gentleman said, get proper knobs on a spindle with plenty of mounting options and you could glue / pin the rest if you wanted to

https://www.morehandles.co.uk/blog/More ... ind-I-need explains spindles quite well, threaded or tapped spindles, then a washer and appropriate handle/knob shouldn't require any screwing

overlander matt
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed 2nd Jan, 2019 10:12 pm

Re: Door lock options

Post by overlander matt » Wed 11th Nov, 2020 9:06 pm

That answers the question about how best to secure the door knobs. Now it is a matter of choosing appropriate knobs. I could really do with something fairly economical... Mention of Broughtons makes me a bit concerned...

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