Wood graining and linseed paint.

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plasticpigeon
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Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by plasticpigeon » Wed 10th Mar, 2021 10:27 am

I have been experiemnting with woodgraining. I want to wood grain my kitchen fire surround (it would have surrounded a range originally, and what it there is now a total fiction made up by me) to make it look like oak or some dark wood. I thought I would try a mix of polurethane varnish, white spirit and various natural earth powders for the glaze, and I have found raw umber to be a good colour at the moment. However the thinned varnish was drying far tyoo fast and I needed something with more "open" time. I read about whether it is possible to mix linseed oil with varnish and apparently people use this kind of mix for "wiping varnish". Last night a tried a roughly 50:50 mix of boiled linseed oil and polyurethane varnish and added a small amount of driers for good luck and tried again. Though the result wasn't acceptable that was down to my lack of skill and not the glaze drying too quickly so I wiped it off and I shall try ahgain tonight. I also painted a plastic yoghurt pot with the glaze to see if it would dry at all, and this morning it has pretty much gone off! I tried this mix as I have a few Victorian books with paint recipes and they are pretty much completely based on linseed oil, driers, turpentine and pigment, often using lead white as a base. I hear a lot of people talk about how linseed paint takes ages to dry or polymerise and I wondered why not just add a bit of driers to reduce the open time. Or indeed could a varnish be made from boiled linseed and driers? When I look at the plethora of oils and finishes available these days I wonder whether most of them are just nonsense.

88v8
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by 88v8 » Sun 14th Mar, 2021 10:33 am

Hubble bubble... few people nowadays do more than open a tin, good for you :)

A few years ago I asked the maker of a driers whether it would work with linseed, the answer was dunno.
It could make such a huge difference to linseed's practicality, one would think the linseed manufacturers would have looked into it.

Staining and graining is a superb period finish. Our first house (1932) originally had all its wood stained and grained, although the graining was rather cursory and one would have been hard pressed to determine quite which wood was being evoked.

Ivor

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Sun 14th Mar, 2021 11:27 am

er. Varnish is, basically, boiled linseed oil with driers... ok, was.

you need this...

https://www.decoratingdirect.co.uk/viewprod/r/RATOS/

I was going to say, dont get Polyvine stuff... apparently JH is no more and its all polyvine.

Anyway. The JH stuff was the OG, as the kids say. Used it at college, did a fantastic marbled table for my Mum.

Then, in my ignorance decided I didnt need to buy it to do some oak graining in a famous church, because I would bodge it with some floor finish and some colourisers. I didnt.

Graining takes skill. I was lucky to see one of the UK's finest at work. Maybanks Snr, doing the ceilings in Palace of Westminster. His tower fell over narrowly missing me and causing me to call the London air ambulance to Parliament. But I digress.

Buy the traditional oil based scumble glaze (longer open time) you can have my turkey feather, flogger and badger softener brushes...

Oil based is softer to blend too with your badger. Water based stuff is totally awful.

Suggest you buy some excellent Mixol pigment colourisers. Theyre not as sexy as traditionally milled earth pigments, I have pounds of burnt umber I will never use... but they perform much better.

And practice, lots. I realised that you cant just wing it, graining takes practice, especially the corners. Flag up Nigel Watts if he is still on here, I did some work at his house and he grained his doors.

Cant remember if they were any good (all I remember is his Lie Neilsen plane collection) but knowing Nigel I bet they were pretty good. I think he eventually posted pics here.

If you are going for oak I would suggest white, yellow and raw Sienna for background, raw Sienna and burnt (Turkey) umber for glaze, drag your grain then wipe your medullary rays.

and black. and raw umber. obviously. if your colour is looking a little bright, add a touch of either to your scumble.

I can mix colours in my head but a good cheat would be A. Find a colour image of oak you like. B. Try and find a close up timber image or photo a piece of oak IRL. C. Enlarge this in an editor and crop around i. The lighter background colour / medullary rays and ii. The darker striped grain.

Then simply mix two colours to match the blown up patches, easier to compare. Lighter colour is scumble background. Darker colour is graining scumble glaze. Just drag to 'add' grain, and wipe off for medullary rays. If you want to be posh you can experiment with wiping off for knots and apply a third very dark brown to form centre of knots / pips.

Ceiling of parliament has only two colour method.

Best I ever saw was the pitch pine in the Pilkington Building adjacent to St James Palace. Think they used four or five colours including a dark brown for knots and a grey blue. Didn't realise for quite a while it was painted and were several metre wide panels.

Mixol are made by Ze Germans. So raw sienna = Kamel etc, you will work it out.

and yes, i made my own oils and waxes, and chemical stains and shellacks, because.

https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-co ... 0854420308

I still mix all my own colours and stains but buy all my finishes, you know, because.

I can mix better colours than I can buy. But I cant make better waxes, shellacks or varnishes. But dont let me dissuade you from inhaling terebene...

Also.

https://www.amazon.com/Professional-Pai ... 0823044181

I cannot remember who I lent this to, but I remember thinking don't do it. Bought it over 30 years ago. Ridiculously ridiculous skill, lovely as a coffee table book.

plasticpigeon
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by plasticpigeon » Mon 15th Mar, 2021 10:36 pm

I spent all of saturday trying to simulate quarter sawn oak on a kitchen range fire surround. I shoudln't have bothered, it is absurdly difficult. My house also had the woodwork woodgrained in a very basic way. Red lead primer then a flogged coat of dark glaze. I only know beecause one door frame was boxed in and the woodgraining was untouched underneath. I wish I had taken a photo now. I was going to try and improve on that but have now decided as I can do no better I will straight grain and flog, or perhaps use the rocker on a few panels. I fear it will take me ages, but the coat of dark brown I have put on today looks even worse than the faux red lead ( or poo brown as my ex called it) colour I used previously. Also dulux have changed their solvent borne composition again so now it is the consistency of custard and impossible to use.

plasticpigeon
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by plasticpigeon » Mon 15th Mar, 2021 10:37 pm

That book looks interesting Toby!

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Mon 15th Mar, 2021 10:44 pm

Which one? The wood finishing one was required reading at London College of Furniture. He's a bit of a ponce being an RCA graduate but it's worth it just for the apothecary section! The decorative painting one is also brilliant, the skill level is insane, again, just nice to look at the pictures!

Oh and yes! It's an very acquired skill, as I said, I thought I could do it! Not a chance. You need to use the proper materials as advised above, they make proprietary scumble glazes.

Try painting in your heart grain first. Then apply glaze around edges. Then use your dragger to create the fine grain wiggling as you go. Then flog. Then comb / use pin wheel to simulate grain. Then let set for a bit, then soften with your badger.

I wouldn't use a heel for oak as the heart grain figure isn't smooth, it's jagged, so you are better of freehanding it. Heels are good for simulating pine or other timbers that have smooth sided heart grain.

And unless you are artistic (I have painted since I could hold a brush) don't bother. You also need to study wood grain, like Da Vinci studied horses or human bodies. It's quite methodical once you get it. I was quite good at marbling but wood graining is much harder.

Isn't red lead a deep orange colour? At least it was the last time I bought it.

Maybanks Snr was amazing. Only two colours. It all came to life when he wiped off for the medullary rays, took seconds. I guess it took him a few decades to get that good, he must have been late 60s when I worked with him.

Flyfisher
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Flyfisher » Tue 16th Mar, 2021 9:43 am

Just as an observation, why is wood graining a widely accepted technique but when applied to structural oak beams (as a recently discussed alternative to arduous stripping) it seems to be generally denigrated as a fake technique?

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Tue 16th Mar, 2021 11:54 am

I think you may have been mistaken. Or maybe I missed something? One of us anyway. I wasn't aware people were discussing graining, just a company that painted the beams off white and seemingly dumped a bunch of wax on it. That's a little unfair to the skilled art of graining!

Not even sure one could grain an old, irregular, friable beam anyway. You use badger and squirrel brushes and feathers, not sure how many hours they would last getting snagged on old beams.

Also not sure getting your beams grained by a skilled expert at £50+ an hour would be terribly cheaper than stripping.

The companies that were mentioned had fake pictures and were lying on their websites. That was my issue.

I wasn't aware people were looking down on graining. Must of missed that.

But apart from the illegal aspect of lying to your customers and the effect looking crap it's possibly because it's unauthentic. Beams were either left raw or white washed. I am not aware of ever seeing any structural beams grained. Not that that's what the companies were offering.

Probably great if you have a cheap casement around an RSJ to match in.

Nothing wrong with graining. Ask Michaelangelo.

Flyfisher
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Flyfisher » Tue 16th Mar, 2021 1:49 pm

I may well be misunderstanding or mistaken. Quite possibly both.

My understanding, summarised by wikipedia so perhaps not entirely definitive, is that "Graining is the practice of imitating wood grain on a non-wood surface, or on relatively undesirable wood surface, in order to increase that surface's aesthetic appeal. Graining was common in the 19th century, as people were keen on imitating hard, expensive woods by applying a superficial layer of paint onto soft, inexpensive woods. " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graining

Thus, it's effectively an applied, decorative effect . . . which seems to be more or less exactly what that company was offering for structural oak timbers. ie an applied, decorative effect.

OK, the precise mechanics of how the effect is applied might vary, but that wasn't my point.

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Tue 16th Mar, 2021 2:03 pm

I see.

Venn diagrams.

Graining = applied painted effect.
Throwing a tin of paint on some wood = applied painted effect.
Graining = Trompe l'oeil.
Painting beams cream and rubbing brown on it once dry = not quite trompe l'oeil is it? You are not tricking the eye into thinking an old oak beam is mahogany for example, you are simply changing the colour of oak to cream paint and glazing. It's a neat idea though as you get a lighter more even colour and the glaze highlights some of the topology. I think the problem is, the lies, the fake photos and small low resolution images. It's a bit like changing rooms. Looks good on TV but up close in the same room looks totally crap. Possibly better on A frame roof beams that are further away. I think for eye level beams I would strip or simply paint white.

You are correct. It's a painted effect, but it's not graining. Specifically it's not graining! As no grain is applied! The glaze in this case gets its pattern by following the existing topology= thus looks like generic painted wood.
Graining normally meant to imitate different woods. So no. What was discussed was not graining. More like a brass rubbing type technique. It is literally painting and glazing. It's the painting in the grain with fitches, draggers, floggers, tiddlers and feathers, heels, rollers and combs that's the graining. :D

(Rag rolling a wall isn't marbling, although both are applied painted effects)

And BT dubs. Wikipedia is very occasionally incomplete. Graining was popular from the 16th century up until the 1960s. Most banks, pubs and churches had graining up until the 1960s and many skilled polishers also did graining, like my Grandfather, Great Grandfather, Great great Grandfather and Great Great Great Grandfather (the latter two being decorative painters) And, to be as annoying as physically possible, as is my wont, the best ever graining I saw, as I said, was in the Pilkington building, which was pine grained to look like pine!

As far as I recall I said it seemed like a good idea. Both websites mentioned had fake photos and factual inaccuracies (lies) which was my problem, not the idea. The guys running the website are dishonest and fake. They may do a lovely job. But their website is fake. And they don't do graining!

My confusion was whether 'graining had been generally denigrated'. As I think it was not. AFAIR myself and everyone else thought it was an interesting idea, the two tone effect and everyone on PP I think appreciates traditional graining, I know I do. In fact I wanted to do graining myself after getting my City and Guilds but I under estimated it's difficulty. I would of had to do another course I think.

Obviously it's about now I should also point out that graining is actually a misnomer.

As grain denotes the pattern of holes in the wood, granted which can be mimicked by using a check roller... But 90% of graining concerns imitating the figure. Which is the pattern of coloured stripes, bands, knots, quilts and burrs in the wood.

So. Semantically, graining should be called figuring.

https://www.maybankassociates.com/about

^^^ Website is rubbish, so is their IG but drop them an email and ask them to send you photos of graining. I polished the deputy Prime Ministers linenfold panels whilst Roberts father grained the ceiling. Their website is rubbish because they don't need it. Pretty sure they get enough work.

Flyfisher
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Flyfisher » Tue 16th Mar, 2021 8:23 pm

Semantics?
According to that wiki page, 'graining' is an applied finish to imitate wood grain, whereas that company offers an applied finish to imitate stripped beams.
Sure, the devil is in the detail but at the high level the two things sound very similar, at least to a layman like me.

Perhaps you should update and correct the Wikipedia page about 'graining'?

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Wed 17th Mar, 2021 1:12 am

Lol. Maybe read slower Fly sir.

You keep misreading. The semantics I referred to were the difference between graining and figuring, not the derivation, etymology and accepted usage of the verb 'graining'. I don't head a fascist quango to rule on language, I gently elucidate facts.

Graining = highly skilled trompe l'oeil technique to artistically mimic wood grain.

Painting beams off white and washing a contrasting colour over the top = Painting beams off white and washing a contrasting colour over the top. :D

It's a 'paint effect' but it's not graining.

Not sure how much slower I can talk! Painting your mahogany handrail in gloss brown paint is an applied finish, it is, but it's not French polishing. Nor is is woodfinishing, it is simply painting.

Not the same. If you are convinced the etymology of the word is incorrect why don't you amend the Wikipedia page. :D (It's actually factually incorrect, contradictory and quite poor)

I think Fly if you are struggling to comprehend the derivation of language you may want to buy and look at the book I refer to above. When you see the level of skill involved maybe you will find it easier to understand.

And btw. Stripped beams do not look like cream paint daubed with brown thanks very much! Maybe ask Rob Tavendale to send you a photo of his stripped, shellac and waxed hearth beam, replete with warding marks. I don't remember it being a cream colour, sumptuously mellow and deep browns as I recall. I have actually grained a pine casement beam over an RSJ to look like the adjacent 400 year old elm and oak beams. I used stains, shellac and painted in the grain. I also sanded and patinated the surface to create damage and cracks. So technically that would be called 'faking' rather than graining, although I did grain it! :roll:
Last edited by Toby Newell on Wed 17th Mar, 2021 1:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

plasticpigeon
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by plasticpigeon » Wed 17th Mar, 2021 1:19 am

Everything I have read about "graining" suggests that the material to be grained must be very flat so that the simulated woodgrain realised is that applied by the person doing the graining and not due to any texture in the substrate. Perhaps the Wikipedia page is not specific enough.

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Wed 17th Mar, 2021 1:31 am

TLDR WARNING LOOK AWAY NOW:

(Also those allergic to sardonic flavoured attempts at humour)
Flyfisher wrote:
Tue 16th Mar, 2021 1:49 pm
My understanding, summarised by wikipedia so perhaps not entirely definitive.
Perhaps. Not. Entirely. (Pause) Definitive.

Readers can ignore the following verbage. Unless they are actually interested in graining.

Pigeon.

You are exactly correct. Many grainers, like my Grandfather or Mr Maybank Snr also did marbling and gilding for example where having a perfectly smooth ground is essential. So yes, needs to be smooth, certainly would be incredibly difficult to do on an old beam. Impossible on a friable beam. Normal work doesn't normally require grain filling or gessoing as wood is less smooth than marble. For marbling the illusion dissolves quickly unless the surface is flawlessly flat. And obviously in water gilding the surface needs to be immaculate or you will tear your leaf. If you want to turn say an oak base wood into Canadian maple then obviously the wide open oak grain pores will be a tell tale that alerts the mind that it is not seeing maple. In this case the grain needs to be completely filled and cut back.

No. The Wikipedia page is almost entirely incorrect, edited by an American with zero knowledge. 'these days a sponge is used' lol. Wrong. Utterly. He means sponging or rag rolling walls.

Says main brush is mottler. Wrong. One if many, used for flat washes in most all modern paint effects. Graining specific brushes are flogger, dragger (they all end in ER, you can see his confusion :lol: ) tiddler, softener, fitch and artist. Graining tools are combs, feathers, heels and check rollers. Obviously rags and possibly a Mahl stick. Oh, sticks. And these days plastic sheeting. Anything that works. Everything he does not mention! Apart from mottler. Which you may use for applying the ground scumble, although any good brush will do. He says brushes were used in the C19th but these days people use sponges to grain on bricks and brass (Presumably after plastering them with stucco?) Wrong. Wrong and Wrong. He says it involves applying layer of paint to wood then says base layer is a water stain. Wrong. Contradictory. And thus farcical. Anyone still awake by this point will have realised the entry is nonsensical.

Water stains lol. Wrong. Using beer. Wrong. Stale beer was used in making a white ring removing paste using cigar ash but not in stains. And vandyke crystals. Wrong. Vandyke crystals are dissolved in hot water with a dash of soda or ammonia. Says van dyke crystals give a burnt umber colour. Wrong. Says colour range is from light brown to black, wrong. They give a brown orange colour.

Moot really as transparent water dyes (I use van dyke all the time) are not opaque, you know, being the antonym of transparent! Which means the underlying grain would show through, so, totally useless.

The entire point of graining is to obliterate the existing wood grain to facilitate the mimicry of a different one over the top. Such a basic fundamental contradiction alone makes the entry utterly nonsensical and irrelevant.

Mmmm, Egyptian dynasty started c. 5000 years ago not 3000. Maybe he means they did graining in 1000BC. Possible. Says they imported rare woods then says simulated? They possibly did but have not seen proof. Not entirely sure a dynasty that could build multi billion pound mausoleums including tens of kilos of gold would want or need to use fake wood, seeing as the page author states they could get hold of the real thing. Unless it was a logistical engineering issue, like marbling in the Cistine chapel. Still, he has no citations.

Says they used stucco. Mmmm. 5000 years ago. He needs to update more pages. I don't doubt by 1000BC the Egyptians were using some form of plaster only maybe not for graining. I mean stucco is plaster and not generally used on wood. There is a stucco type material used on wood from the Renaissance onwards called... Gesso. It too has an O at the end. I can see how he got confused between masonry plaster and rabbit skin glue size. Because, you know, both words are a similar length. And both have an O at the end.

Granted you can add plaster of Paris to gesso to give a a smoother base but I'm not sure how easy it was for the Egyptians to obtain a substance named after the capital city of a country not yet invented to produce a substance not yet invented. I agree the feats of the Egyptians were astounding and maybe the aliens or lizard people gave them a time machine to import gesso from the future but told them it was stucco for a laugh, but. (Citation needed)

Utter nonsense. For the Wikipedia entry to make sense you would need to amend the entry for Egyptian dynasty. Walnut crystals. Gesso. Stucco. Stain. Beer. Paint. And lizard people.

I think think the only two correct facts are that it is an applied paint finish simulating wood grain and that it was most popular during the 19th century. It is slightly confusing when discussing a painted effect to then explain that the base colour is obtained by applying a wash of walnut shell crystals in beer :lol: :lol: :lol: I wonder what Farrow and Ball would name that!

You have to concede the incongruity of the Wikipedia entry on an applied paint finish in describing applying a base layer of transparent water stain (which last time I checked was not classed as a paint, although I haven't checked the Wikipedia page for paint recently :lol:)

He talks an incredible amount of bollocks but declined to offer the most basic of facts. He doesn't mention anywhere the words 'scumble' and 'glaze'. Which is what graining is!

(Sidebar: Wikipedia entries are often edited by people with Asperger's or Autism, it gives them a feeling of control, they may be rambling but usually contain more facts, but just in case though sometimes it's better to leave inaccuracies on obscure unimportant entries alone as Wikipedia is partly their world too)

The entry is simply almost entirely wrong and written by someone who has no clue about finishing, or decorative painting. It's actually contradictory and nonsensical.

The fact that my family have been graining for 150 years and I watched one of the country's most skilled grainers at work at The Palace of Westminster (who was himself in his 60s or 70s and whose own family also has a 150 year history) whilst I restored the woodwork below and moved his work tower for him is, romanticism aside, almost exactly 100% irrelevant. Yes I studied finishing for years. Yes I practiced trompe l'oeil, yes I have tried graining (badly!) and yes I do own a badger softener, flogger and have a 25 year old white and orange can of JH Ratcliffe oil scumble somewhere but still. Mostly irrelevant. What isn't is that 25 years ago I bought my first books on decorative paint effects.

I just read a lot. Although possibly less than Nigel.

(My entry?>>>) Graining. Decorative paint effect used to simulate wood. A background or ground colour called scumble covered by a slow drying semi transparent glaze that can be manipulated by various brushes and tools to simulate the grain and figure of wood. Used since ancient times and developed during the mid Renaissance at the same time pigment and binder technology improved. Popular in Europe from the late 18th through to the 19th centuries right up until the 1960s. Many public buildings, banks, pubs and town halls in the UK frequently employed grainers up until the point that the skills were largely lost. Traditionally, before the 1960s in the UK, decorative painters and French polishers undertaking a seven year apprenticeship would often also be taught graining. Notable graining includes many of the ceilings of the Palace of Westminster which are a light quarter sawn oak, two colour effect which contrasts with the oak timber work which is either golden oak or mid oak colour. (Citation: First person eye witness account) Can be applied to any surface but historically most often on cheaper woods to simulate more exotic and expensive ones and on moldings and plaster work such as ceiling panels, dado and cornicing. Today graining is often employed on plywood and a range of construction surfaces. Sometimes a layer of gesso, plaster of Paris in gold size, was applied to provide a smooth base and hide the original grain pores on high class work as in water gilding. Base ground is normally lighter, once dry a semi transparent darker glaze is applied. Base colour was traditionally (linseed) oil based as was the glaze but modern scumble glazes can be water (acrylic) based although these have less open time, are harder to work and soften. Most high class work still involves oil based glazes but quicker drying water based finishes are often used for areas far from eye level and for small girth non continuous areas. Disadvantages of the fast drying acrylic finishes are that the blending is less delicate, the open time is reduced limiting panel size and Brushes dry out quicker. Brushes used are the mottler for the base, dragger, flogger, and overgrainer, for the glaze. Fine round sable artist brushes and hog hair fitches are used with Mahl sticks for fine touches. Tools such check rollers, swan feathers, heels and combs are used in both additive and subtractive techniques to either add glaze or remove and expose the base. When the main graining is finished the partially dry but still tacky glaze layer is softened and blended by gently brushing with a softening brush. Oil glazes are much easier to soften typically with a badger hair brush, modern water based glazes being stiffer are often manipulated using a harder white hog hair. Deft softening brings the effect to life and can greatly improve realism. Normal work employs a one colour glaze layer over the base. More sophisticated work involves multiple glaze layers with multiple colours and knots and other features being painted in freehand. Sticks, rags and plastic sheeting are often employed, along with natural sponge and cork, the range of tools is only limited by the imagination. After drying the surface is sealed in with a compatible clear finish to protect it. In the UK proprietary traditional oil based scumble glaze was produced by JH Ratcliffe. These days Ratcliffe no longer exists and Polyvine currently offers the greatest range of graining materials, including traditional oil based glazes.
Vintage-Scumble-Oil-Can-JHRatcliffes-Southport-a.jpg
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It's really not that difficult. It's more logic, common sense and understanding of semantics.

The largest Venn diagram circle is applied paint effects. Of which painting and glazing and graining reside.

Then there is a smaller subset circle which envelopes graining, but not painting and glazing.

Graining = applied paint effect to simulate wood grain.
Glazing = applied paint effect, does not simulate grain.
Simulate = copy.

This is getting silly.

And Flyfisher. Unless you have recently been taken over by the Triffids I remember you as a clever person and as such you know that the wonderful wonderful Wikipedia is, on occasion, total bollocks. And that if you are actually interested in obtaining information on a subject your second search after Wikipedia. Should be another website.

Or better still book.

https://www.amazon.com/Professional-Pai ... 0823044181

Telling the lovely, intelligent Flyfisher that anyone who confines their knowledge of a subject to a 5 minute perusal of one Wikipedia page without cross referencing obvious contradictions isn't displaying the full panoply of human intellect would be incredibly condescending. I assume he knows this and finds it easier to poke me with a stick rather than spend a few weeks reading. Many people do. Touché.

And here's the rub Fly old chap. Anyone could amend my proposed less farcical Wikipedia entry. Whereas they cannot hack PP. And thus anyone seriously interested in researching graining may be directed here via the search bots and use my posts as a jumping off point for further study. Which partly explains my MO and reason for my detailed posts, corroborated by emails from all over the world. Seek and you shall find!

Hopefully your definitive knowledge has now been augmented slightly :mrgreen: (ok, sorry, please, not the face)

This has been a good waste of time during my end of lockdown CBA to do anything wobble. Fortunately for everyone's eyeballs I will be booking in a couple of years of work shortly and thus stop annoying people with. Facts.

And advanced sardonics.
Last edited by Toby Newell on Wed 17th Mar, 2021 8:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

Toby Newell
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Re: Wood graining and linseed paint.

Post by Toby Newell » Wed 17th Mar, 2021 8:15 am

Newsflash: FOUND THEM! PLEASE SEE 'VICTORIAN DECORATING UPDATE' (page 2) I have given it a bump. The astoundingly impressively well researched Mr Watts. Hope is well and ok, and has his post alerts set to on!

I shall assume Flyfisher is smiling, especially as I have saved him weeks of study and cross referencing on a subject he's probably not really interested in. You're welcome. :mrgreen:

Now I have created a fairly factually accurate, semi interesting and first hand knowledgeable, if slightly hidden, Wikipedia entry we can get back to the main point.

Which is trying to persuade the pigeon to order some scumble and brushes and start practicing! Once he has worked it out, please invite me round and show me how to do it, because I would quite like to learn.

Can someone page Nigel Watts? I am sure he grained the pine doors of his Islington Grade 2 Georgian town house and posted photos on here. I think he grained them mahogany, not oak but he may be able to give more helpful advice than anyone else seeing as he's actually worked out how to do it! (I did his floors btw) Nigel is the type of dedicated amateur that is able to produce professional quality results through weight of research and effort. He certainly surpassed my skill level, which admittedly is close to zero.

Nigel is in fact the only customer I have ever met who does more research than I do. I am slightly surprised looking back that he asked me to polish his floors, I'm sure he would of done just as good a job.

So he would be the man. He has almost certainly read up more about graining than I ever have. Hope he pops by.

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